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SLD.384.1
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SLD.384.1
REPOSITORY INFORMATION:
Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave, SE
Washington, D. C., United States, 20540
phone: (202) 707-5000
DATE: April 2, 1793

WATERMARK INFORMATION:
PRIMARY: Shield (IPH KEY: NA)
DIMENSIONS: 138 mm high x 72 mm wide
SECONDARY: post horn; crown; "J HONIG | & | ZOONEN "
PROCESS: DYLUX

PAPER INFORMATION:
MANUFACTURE: Laid
CHAINS: 26
PAPERMILL: De Vergulde Bijenkopf (The Gilded Beehive) Mill
PAPERMAKER: Honig, J. & Zonen
LOCATION: Zaan, Netherlands

ARTIFACT INFORMATION:
ARTIFACT: Jefferson letter
YEAR OF USE: 1793
REPOSITORY: Library of Congress
SHELFMARK: Box 32, # 14456

DATABASE INFORMATION:
RECORD ADDED: 10 October 2003 NO. 2667


GENERAL COMMENTS: Thomas Jefferson, General Correspondence. Exchange Notes.

NOTE ON THE PAPER: See Voorn 1960, p. 554, De Vergulde Bijenkopf (The Gilded Beehive) Mill: “This most famous Honig-mill originally was a small oil-mill, named De Kwikstaart (Wagtail), at Wormer. In 1662, the small mill was bought by Cornelis Jans Honigh and equipped for paper making. At the same time, it got its name of Gilded Beehive, as an allusion to the Honig’s family-name (Honig = Honey). In 1668 the mill was moved to Zaandijk and there, in the course of many years, it was changed, enlarged and improved till it was one of the most important paper mills in the country. The sons Cornelis, Jacob and Adriaan Corneliszoon Honigh equipped the mill in 1675 for making writing papers. They also had shares in other paper mills, like De Hobbezak and De Bel. Cornelis Adriaans Honigh, grandson of the founder, managed the mill till 1712; in that year he sold his shares to his cousins Cornelis and Jan Jacobs Honig, owners of the mill De Veenboer. The company of C. & J. Honig became a very important one. Cornelis acquired the Herderskind mill in 1773, the company had an important share in the Herder mill, and in 1738 Jan Honig bought the Eendracht mill. In 1738 the brothers separated, Cornelis taking over the management of the Veenboer and Herdeskind mills, Jan Honig keeping the Bijenkorf and Eendracht mills.

“Jan Jacobs Honig died in 1757 and was succeeded by his son Jacob Jans Honig who, in 1774, sold the Eendracht mill and acquired in its place the Wever mill. The company of Jacob Honig & Zonen, always under the management of succeeding sons, had a long life. The Beehive mill was at last sold, in 1854, to Gerbrand de Jong, paper maker with the Schoolmeester and Kaarsemaker mills. The mill was burnt down in 1902.”

COMPANION: WORD.207/TJ 407

REFERENCES:
Voorn, Henk. De papiermolens in de provincie Noord-Holland. Haarlem: Papierwereld, 1960.